Day: January 8, 2021

January 8, 2021 Off

Zotac Gaming RTX 3080 Amp Holo Review

By tracy
Since the launch of the RTX 30-series, I’ve been able to take a look at a wide array of cards from many of the biggest GPU manufacturers in the business. Of that line-up, one notable absence has been Zotac. That changes today. I’ve spent the last week putting the Zotac Gaming RTX 3080 Amp Holo through its paces to see exactly how it holds up. Coming to market at $799, it definitely has the looks of a flagship graphics card, but does it have the performance to match?

Zotac Gaming RTX 3080 Amp Holo Review

Zotac Gaming RTX 3080 Amp Holo – Design and Features

The Zotac Gaming RTX 3080 Amp Holo is a gorgeous GPU. It’s clear that the designers put a lot of time into making it an eye-catching centerpiece for your gaming PC. This is largely because of the striking RGB strip and logo along its side. It’s shielded in glossy plastic, which is terrible for fingerprints, but in person makes the card look a bit fancier and higher-end than comparable cards like the MSI RTX 3080 Gaming X Trio. The backplate is also cut with a pattern of RGB stripes. Curiously, the face

January 8, 2021 Off

John Lin’s physics sandbox returns with the best water I’ve ever seen

By tracy

I’m increasingly convinced that the next big thing in games tech isn’t ray-traced puddles or eye-watering 8K displays, but voxels. Laugh all you want, but go ahead and look at John Lin’s captivating water up there and tell me I’m wrong, I dare you.

Malindy Hetfield first spotted Lin’s lush voxel forests for us last November. Since then, your man’s been plugging away at the project, showing off clouds of butterflies and moody moonlit pups. But it’s this week’s update that really blew me away, with a dive into some absolutely staggering water physics.

We’ve come a hell of a long way since Minecraft’s slow-moving cubes, readers. Lin’s fluids flow and splash and spray remarkably, refracting light and filling spaces just as you’d expect. Lin goes into great technical detail in the YouTube description, explaining that the water is fully volumetric to act like a real fluid—and while it currently only interacts with terrain, he hopes to soon have it splashing around players and objects.

An interesting aside is that, in this video, all the water is spawned from limitless faucets—meaning that the world will eventually submerge itself completely. Lin’s next problem seems to be the simple job of,

January 8, 2021 Off

Ratropolis Review – Real-Time Rategy

By tracy

The deckbuilding genre, once relegated to the physical tabletop, has seen explosive growth on the indie PC scene in recent years. Now, skilled developers are mixing, mashing, and combining traditional deckbuilding mechanics with other genres. In Ratropolis, Cassel Games successfully integrates card construction with city-building and defense to create a charming strategy mix. The resulting amalgamation is a satisfying soiree of rodents, robots, and giant ducks that keeps you coming back game after game. Your army of adorable mice and machines must restore the glory of the ratropolis! Yes, that’s like a city for mice.

The goal is simple: You must survive 30 waves of onslaught as you build up a city. To that end, you select a main commander mouse that dictates what cards are available on each run. Each mouse has a variety of strategies to employ, and while you start with basic loadouts like the military-oriented general and the money-laden merchant, later unlockable characters like the scientist, shaman, and naval officer add many timing considerations and more advanced foibles to the game. 

Each run starts simple and fresh, with you defending your fledgling ratropolis from two different lanes. As you begin adding cards to your deck, you